Wednesday, March 08, 2017

Lab releases first Advert tease for Sansar

Linden Lab have released an advert for Sansar, giving potential users their first proper glimpse of this new platform which will run side by side with Second Life

Sunday, March 05, 2017

Free Abranimations BENTO dance


Pro Club Bento Dances and Free Pro Club Dance #1

Weekend Gift!  Free BENTO dance from
Abranimations in their London City Store.

FREE this weekend ONLY!. You can find it in the crate in front of the new dance vendors set to sale for 0L in the London City Store.

Friday, March 03, 2017

Willie Nelson kicks off a month of folk and country

Everyone loves a bit of Willie.  He has been popular as part of the Highwayman concerts, but this weekend, he's out on his own appearing in London City as part of our Folk Festival.

Songs written and performed by Willie Nelson include, On the Road Again, Always on my Mind, Crazy, City of New Orleans and Pancho and Lefty.

Come and yeehaw with the great man himself!

The Party starts at 12pm SL (8pm UK) and Willie takes to the stage at 1pm SL.


Thursday, March 02, 2017

London City in Daniel Voyager's top ten

Thank you to acclaimed blogger Daniel Voyager for listing his favourite Second Life blogs and placing London City in the top 10 at number 8. We are in company with some of great blogs out there and it is a rare honour

You can see the full list of Second Life blogs that Dan recommends by heading to his site here

Tuesday, February 28, 2017

The Voice Lounge

Want to have a conversation with a group of people without broadcasting to the whole region?

The voice lounge in London City has its own private voice and sound parcel, separate from the hub area.

This gives residents the chance to chat on voice, uninterrupted by sounds, music and gestures from outside of the lounge area.    The lounge is also voice enabled 24 hours, so during concerts and shows, residents can still use this area undisturbed by other events happening in London City.

Visit the Voice Lounge:

Friday, February 24, 2017

Friday in London

It's Beer O' Clock.  Unwind with an ice cold beer or five and enjoy fun and friendly crowds as the party begins.

The weekend parties kick off now in London City with Bar Soho at 11am SLT (7pm UK), followed by Madame Lala's at 1pm SLT (9pm UK).

Bar Soho:

Madame Lala's:

FREE Bento Dance from Abranimations

Weekend Gift!  Free BENTO dance from
Abranimations, released today and in their London City Store.

FREE this weekend ONLY!. You can find it in the crate in front of the new dance vendors set to sale for 0L.

Saturday, February 18, 2017

User Survey and Opinions

We would really appreciate hearing your opinions about  London City.

Tell us our strengths and weaknesses. What we do well and where we need to strive to do better.

The survey takes only a couple of minutes. Is anonymous and is extremely helpful to us, to ensure you get the best experience when visiting.

Please click the survey link at the top of this page or click here

Thanks for your help.

Friday, February 17, 2017

Dorothy Squires Concert, Saturday 12pm SL

A largely forgotten legend, compared as the British voice of Ethel Merman and all the tragedy of Judy Garland is appearing in London City on Saturday.

The Party starts at 12pm SL (8pm UK) with the show at 1pm SL. 


It is hard to believe that Dorothy Squires, now so forgotten was once the highest paid British singer.

Famous for her belting voice, her outrageous ball gowns and an unbridled and profane temper, Dorothy Squires was a sensation that swept the country in the 1950's and beyond.

In 1953 she married the then unknown actor Roger Moore who was 12 years her junior and used her substantial clout with the right people in Hollywood to get him into movies and television series.

As Roger Moore's career took off, hers began to slide.  Throughout the 1960's she tried to keep her career in momentum, but she suffered from the emerging popularity of the sounds created by new and  younger singers, Cilla Black, Dusty Springfield and Sandy Shaw.

Squires and Moore separated in 1961, when Moore left her to move in with Luisa Mattioli.  Squires refused to divorce him without a substantial settlement and Moore could not re-marry until an agreement was reached and the divorce was finalised 8 years later in 1969.

Now aged 55 she managed to chart one final time with her own cover of "My Way".  New concerts followed at the Palladium, which Squires had hired herself at substantial cost, but her shows sold out in hours and she managed to cover her costs.

By 1971 Dorothy Squires career was almost at and end.   She undertook the first of 30 court cases which would keep her as the focal point in newspapers for the next 15 years.

She successfully sued the News of The World for a story they printed about her and Moore entitled "When love turned sour".

Her new career of suing people for libel began to turn bad when she dragged actor Kenneth More through the courts for accidentally referring to Mattioli as Roger Moore's wife when Moore was still married to Squires at the time.  She lost the case.

In 1973 she was charged with high kicking a taxi driver when he threw her out of his cab for being disorderly.  The same year she was charged with trying to "bribe" a BBC producer to play her records, but the case was dropped.

In 1974 her house burned down and she managed to escape the inferno clutching her jewels and love letters from Roger Moore.  She moved to a new house in Bray, which flooded three weeks later.

In 1982 she was banned from the high courts.  The high court declared her to be a Vexatious Litigant due to the number of bizarre cases she had taken out against other wealthy people seeking compensation for things said about her.  This move by the courts ended her ability from commencing any further legal action without the express permission of the court.  She never got this permission and she was never able to sue again.

Now broke due to the enormous amount of costs incurred losing nearly all of her court cases, Squires accepted the home provided by an adoring fan in Wales.  She retired there and lived out the rest of her life as a recluse.  She died of lung cancer in 1998 at the age of 83.

She is probably the chief architect of all her bad luck, caused by an obsession of pursuing the fame she had once enjoyed, which had come and gone.  Her refusal to realise that fame is fleeting was perhaps her undoing.

That said, she puts on a magnificent (if not a slightly bizarre camp comedy) show, so we hope you will enjoy us for a rather tongue in cheek cabaret concert, celebrating the superstardom of Miss Dorothy Squires.